Total Lunar Eclipse May 15-16

by Gary Boyle



On the night of May 15/16, 2022, North America will witness a total lunar eclipse. This amazing celestial lineup of the Sun, earth and the moon will play out with eastern and central time zones seeing the entire event. Mountain and Pacific zones will witness the eclipse in progress as the moon rises.

This is a very safe event as the full Flower moon moves into the earth’s shadow for almost three and a half hours. Eclipse times are:

Eastern Time Partial umbral eclipse begins: 10:27 p.m. Moon enters the earth’s shadow. Total lunar eclipse begins: 11:29 p.m. Moon turns dark orange or red. Greatest eclipse: 12:11 a.m. Mid-point of the eclipse. Total lunar eclipse ends: 12:53 a.m. Moon begins to leave the shadow. Partial umbral eclipse ends: 1:55 a.m. Moon completely exits earth’s shadow.

Central Time Partial umbral eclipse begins: 9:27 p.m. Moon enters the earth’s shadow. Total lunar eclipse begins: 10:29 p.m. Moon turns dark orange or red. Greatest eclipse: 11:11 p.m. Mid-point of the eclipse. Total lunar eclipse ends: 11:53 p.m. Moon begins to leave the shadow. Partial umbral eclipse ends: 12:55 a.m. Moon exits earth’s shadow.

Mountain Time Partial umbral eclipse begins: 8:27 p.m. Moon enters the earth’s shadow. Total lunar eclipse begins: 9:29 p.m. Moon turns dark orange or red. Greatest eclipse: 10:11 p.m. Mid-point of the eclipse. Total lunar eclipse ends: 10:53 p.m. Moon begins to leave the shadow. Partial umbral eclipse ends: 11:55 p.m. Moon exits earth’s shadow.

Pacific Time Partial umbral eclipse begins: 7:27 p.m. Moon will rise as the eclipse begins. Total lunar eclipse begins: 8:29 p.m. Moon turns dark orange or red. Greatest eclipse: 9:11 p.m. Mid-point of the eclipse. Total lunar eclipse ends: 9:53 p.m. Moon begins to leave the shadow. Partial umbral eclipse ends: 10:55 p.m. Moon exits earth’s shadow.

I am always available for an on-air interview.

Clear skies,

Gary Boyle

The Backyard Astronomer

613-851-6566

Known as “The Backyard Astronomer”, Gary Boyle is an astronomy educator, guest speaker and monthly columnist for the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada. He has been interviewed on more than 55 Canadian radio stations as well as television across Canada and the U.S. In recognition of his public outreach in astronomy, the International Astronomical Union has honoured him with the naming of Asteroid (22406) Garyboyle. Follow him on Twitter: @astroeducator, Facebook and his website: www.wondersofastronomy.com

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